Washington Adventist University Chapter 1 Client Relations Summary Hi dear,I want you to read chapter one and after you read it write one page summary abou

Washington Adventist University Chapter 1 Client Relations Summary Hi dear,I want you to read chapter one and after you read it write one page summary about it. Thanks!I need it on time or before. CHAPTER 1
Client Relations
Coming together is a beginning; Keeping together is progress;
Working together is success.
-Henry Ford
T
his chapter focuses on the relationship between public
relations managers and their clients. It discusses the
unique qualities of these critical relationships, explores
the traditional roles that evolve between clients and PR managers,
and details strategies a manager can use to improve the relation-
ship so that both parties derive maximum benefits from it.
Demonstrating Value, Developing Trust
The customer/vendor relationship in many businesses is relatively
simple. In manufacturing, for example, it can be based on a transac-
tion as simple as the delivery of X widgets for Y dollars.
In public relations, however, the relationship between customer
(client) and vendor (public relations manager) is far more complex.
From the beginning, trust-not transactions—underpins the suc-
cess of the partnership; a PR manager’s effectiveness depends on
access to the organization’s most sensitive information. Furthermore,
the value of public relations is usually more subjective than the value
of other goods and services. The client may have no experience in
1
0
Client Relations
is being accomplished in monetary terms? Answers to this question
public relations activities beg an obvious managerial question: What
are generally muted, murky, and often misleading.”
To be effective and keep customers happy, public relations
managers must educate as they sell. In fact, managers should main
following roles offers advantages and disadvantages to both parties.
The five roles:
tain a regular education program to ensure that their customers
remain aware of the value of their services.
Technical Services Provider
An Evolutionary Role
In most customer/vendor relationships in public relations, the man-
agers’ roles evolve over time, as their clients become more familiar
with, and dependent upon their advice. Nager and Truitt note that:
The practitioner is hired for communication skills and mass
media experience…
Other specialized services “pur-
chased” by clients include graphics, photography, publica-
tion and broadcast production, public opinion research.
special events planning, fund raising, exhibit planning, and
production.
This relationship has significant limitations because the
PR manager may not gain access to key constituents or necessary
information
A partnership depends on trust. Trust depends upon open-
ness of communication and sensitivity to another’s interests.
That sensitivity depends upon taking pains to discover and
verify those interests and keep them in mind. Discovery and
verification are based upon astute questioning, observation,
and listening. Strategic listening requires that the prospective
client partner will be willing to talk. This willingness to open
up depends, again, upon trust.?
Communication Process Facilitator
In this role, the practitioner functions as an information mediator
among decision-making parties. The consultant in this role is
most concerned with maintaining full participation of those
involved and maximum information exchange.” The role assumes
that the consultant will make the best contribution by working to
provide relevant information to key decision-makers to produce the
best strategic decisions.
Problem Solving Process Facilitator
In building this trust, managers must be continually
aware of the evolutionary nature of their role. Savvy managers will
help guide this evolution by familiarizing themselves with their
clients’ organizations and industries while consistently working to
provide higher, more management-oriented levels of service as the
relationship progresses.
While no two manager/client relationships are identical, there
are some traditional roles. Broom and Smith hypothesize five models
to describe the relationship and expectations between public rela-
tions consultants and their clients. While the authors do not suggest
a direct progression or hierarchy of roles, they do note that it is com-
mon for the relationships to move from a technical
, project-oriented
basis to a more general, advisory role. They also note that each of the
This role involves a “collaborative relationship in which the consultant
helps the client apply a systematic problem-solving approach
Again, the consultant is operating as a facilitator, assisting in the deci-
sion-making process. Key contributions in this role have less to do
with introducing fresh approaches than with helping to draw the best
information from important constituents within the organization.
5. Client Relations
Chapter 1
is being accomplished in monetary terms? Answers to this question
public relations activities beg an obvious managerial question: What
are generally muted, murky, and often misleading.”
To be effective and keep customers happy, public relations
managers must educate as they sell. In fact, managers should main
following roles offers advantages and disadvantages to both parties.
The five roles:
tain a regular education program to ensure that their customers
remain aware of the value of their services.
Technical Services Provider
An Evolutionary Role
In most customer/vendor relationships in public relations, the man-
agers’ roles evolve over time, as their clients become more familiar
with, and dependent upon their advice. Nager and Truitt note that:
The practitioner is hired for communication skills and mass
media experience…
Other specialized services “pur-
chased” by clients include graphics, photography, publica-
tion and broadcast production, public opinion research.
special events planning, fund raising, exhibit planning, and
production.
This relationship has significant limitations because the
PR manager may not gain access to key constituents or necessary
information
A partnership depends on trust. Trust depends upon open-
ness of communication and sensitivity to another’s interests.
That sensitivity depends upon taking pains to discover and
verify those interests and keep them in mind. Discovery and
verification are based upon astute questioning, observation,
and listening. Strategic listening requires that the prospective
client partner will be willing to talk. This willingness to open
up depends, again, upon trust.?
Communication Process Facilitator
In this role, the practitioner functions as an information mediator
among decision-making parties. The consultant in this role is
most concerned with maintaining full participation of those
involved and maximum information exchange.” The role assumes
that the consultant will make the best contribution by working to
provide relevant information to key decision-makers to produce the
best strategic decisions.
Problem Solving Process Facilitator
In building this trust, managers must be continually
aware of the evolutionary nature of their role. Savvy managers will
help guide this evolution by familiarizing themselves with their
clients’ organizations and industries while consistently working to
provide higher, more management-oriented levels of service as the
relationship progresses.
While no two manager/client relationships are identical, there
are some traditional roles. Broom and Smith hypothesize five models
to describe the relationship and expectations between public rela-
tions consultants and their clients. While the authors do not suggest
a direct progression or hierarchy of roles, they do note that it is com-
mon for the relationships to move from a technical
, project-oriented
basis to a more general, advisory role. They also note that each of the
This role involves a “collaborative relationship in which the consultant
helps the client apply a systematic problem-solving approach
Again, the consultant is operating as a facilitator, assisting in the deci-
sion-making process. Key contributions in this role have less to do
with introducing fresh approaches than with helping to draw the best
information from important constituents within the organization.
5. Client Relations
Chapter 1
Read every
on. On your first day if you already know names, the projects
reevaluate the organizational goals and determine what people will
fit together best to achieve them. This involves a four-step process
to ensure that the manager knows exactly who he or she is seeking,
recognizes the right qualities in the candidates, and uses the hiring
issues that are going to be attracting media attention, you
to ensure that the new member of the team will contribute effec-
tively.
sup-
you will be ahead of the curve on day one….
thing about your new company that you can get your hands
people are working on, publication schedules, and the hot
will be ahead of the curve and in a much more relaxed frame
of mind.
3. Your best resource is going to be your staff. Court their
port, but don’t tolerate sabotage. Accept the fact there is
going to be some initial trepidation on the part of your staff.
And remind yourself that reserve is usually part of the get-
ting-to-know-you process, not a sign of rejection. Do what
you can to relieve any tension in the environment.
4. Concentrate immediately on the issues that are troublesome
to your organization. If you’re in a leadership position in
public relations, effective issues management is going to be
right up there on your team’s list of priorities. During your
homework phase, make sure you get well acquainted with
2.1: High-Tech Hiring
your firm’s issues.
Of all of the career transitions the public relations manag-
er makes, the most challenging one may be the move from staff
member to manager. The increase in pay, prestige and power is ini-
tially exciting, but as soon as the first personnel problem occurs,
new managers realize that they are operating in a very different
world, with a new set of rules, methods, and goals.
The objective is still to get the job done, but now the manager
must work through other people to achieve it. This can be particular-
ly challenging when managing exceptionally creative people.
Public relations managers spend so much time searching for
information on-line these days. Why not find employees there as
well?
High-tech hiring is on the rise, as innovative employers use
the latest technology to find the right people for their organizations.
Web sites like Monster.com () match
résumés with the newspaper’s help-wanted section, reaching hun-
dreds of thousands of job seekers. This breadth can be good or bad;
sometimes these sites may throw the net too wide and the manager
can be inundated with responses.
A better alternative may be to post job opportunities on the
organization’s own Web site. Prospective employees can check out the
company’s own resources to see if job opportunities are an appro-
priate fit for their skill sets. Managers can tailor and detail the job
specifications as much as they wish. To refine the quality of the appli-
cations, managers can post a customized application form that
includes only the criteria they care about. On the other hand, if man-
agers want to leave it wide open, they can instruct applicants to send
résumés, portfolios, and other materials on-line.
There’s still no guarantee that the manager won’t have to sift
through poorly suited résumés, but the numbers may be more man-
ageable. There is one additional advantage to using the organiza-
tion’s site to recruit-on-line applicants have already proven them-
selves tech-savvy enough to find and contact the organization
through the site.
Team Building-The Hiring Process
While the hiring process begins a time of transition for the prospec-
tive employee, it is also a time of transition for the rest of the organi-
zation. The manager must take time at this critical juncture to
19 . Personnel
18 –
Chapter 2
education, professional affiliations, career goals, and other related
matters. Depending on the position’s responsibilities, the manager
possible to make sure the right decision is made. A mismatch will not
The hiring decision is critical
, and the manager should do everything
serve the organization or the candidate.
Once the decision is made, the manager should sell the hire
firmly and positively to all involved—the candidate as well as fellow
this transition depends on a positive start.
employees
. The organization is about to change, and the success of
date complete a writing and editing test.
might want to request writing samples and require that the candi-
A candidate’s interpersonal approach is more important for PR
hires than for hires in other industries, because success in the pub-
lic relations industry depends on good interpersonal communica-
tion. Questions about interpersonal and management styles may be
answered through the interview process; the manager may still want
to ask very specific questions about the candidate’s approach to
coworkers, clients, and members of the media. The manager might
pose a series of scenarios based on current clients and media con
tacts to ascertain how the candidate would react in each case. Before
and after the interview, the manager should observe how the candi-
date treats other members of the organization-not only upper level
managers, but also support staff and other employees.
Once the interview is concluded, the
manager
should
pay spe-
cial attention to the quality of the candidate’s follow-up, since this
activity is also essential to the public relations function. Does the
candidate establish and follow up on the next step in the process, to
ensure the continuation of the relationship? Does the candidate
respond promptly to questions and unresolved issues? Overall, is
the candidate tactfully encouraging the process and providing the
assistance needed to advance the hiring decision? This is the
approach managers would want their employees to take with clients
and media contacts. A candidate should be taking this same
approach with members of your organization from the beginning
of your relationship
Outsourcing-A Growing Alternative
One key decision in acquiring help for an organization is whether to
hire or outsource.
According to one 1998 study, 73 percent of respondents who
work in corporate PR departments or agencies said their organiza-
tions outsourced activities. The most frequently outsourced activities
were writing and communications (73 percent); media relations
(45 percent); publicity (38 percent); strategy, counseling, and plan-
ning (37 percent); and event planning (32 percent). Speech writing,
research, community relations, crisis communications, and graph-
ic arts/publication design were also identified.
The decision to outsource usually comes straight from the top,
reported the survey by Bisbee and Co., Inc. and Leone Marketing
Research, both of Orlando, Florida. Public relations vice presidents,
department directors, and account supervisors were most likely to
decide if a public relations activity would be outsourced.
Outsourcing is on the rise for three reasons:
1. It can be cost-effective.
2. New technologies allow more versatile outsourcing arrange-
ments.
3. It allows for significant flexibility-a particularly important
advantage when the workload in an organization fluctuates.
Step Four: Decision Time
Any unresolved questions should be followed up with a telephone or
face-to-face interview before the decision is made. If it is an aptitude
issue, retest. If it’s a personality issue, the manager should include
additional managers in a follow-up interview to get their reactions.
“Initiatives by whatever name-reengineering, restruc-
turing, reinventing, downsizing-often go hand in hand with
27. Personnel
26. Chapter 2

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